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An interesting take on fuel treatments

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An interesting take on fuel treatments

 
 
 
 
  #11  
Old 12-05-2009, 09:48 AM
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Well, this thread is timely. I just got a reply from Shell regarding my question to them about cetane and lubricity of their "premium" diesel fuel. This is what they answered:

Thank you for bringing your concerns to our attention.

This is in response to your inquiry regarding the cetane number of our diesel fuel.
We were advised that Cetane will be at least 40 but usually in the 43 to 46 range
for Shell ULSD. A lubricity additive is added to all ULSD as well.

We appreciate the opportunity to serve you in this matter and look forward to
providing you with quality Shell branded products and service in the future.

If you need further assistance please contact our Shell Solutions Center at
1-888-GO-SHELL (1-888-467-4355).


Sincerely,
Shell Customer Care


Now the answer is not too specific is it? But they do put a lubricity additive in their fuel.
 
  #12  
Old 12-18-2009, 04:21 AM
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I'm only aware of one study in the public domain that showed what raw fuel tested at and how that compared to most of the additives on the shelf today. I was amazed to see that most of the so called additives do nothing for making the fuel more lubricated. Some even hurt lubricity!
By just stating that fuel doesn't lube well enough because it is low in sulfur is indicative of not actually understanding what is going on here. Sulfur doesn't lube fuel at all. Now, removing it does tend to lower the fuels ability to lube, yes. That is because the process of removing the sulfur also happens to remove components that lube the fuel. But to use the measure of sulfur in fuel as an indication of how well it lubes, is false science! Refer back to Cummins response, Shell's response or any other statement you can find on corporate websites all across the globe. They will all tell you that a lube has to be added to fuel now days. The EPA won't allow any lube added to fuel to also add back in sulfur!
You can read this study for yourself and see what I'm talking about . . . . (It also opened my eyes to some of the so- called additives on the market today. Marketing hype and sales pitches are not what I want or need to put into my engine. I want to stick with proven, tested products. Wonder if I can catch the kid before he opens that gallon of Marvel . . . . )
(Don't get me wrong: I think that fuel suppliers are going to just do the minimum and cut costs where they can. So will every other supplier that we purchase anything from. That is just a fact of life. What is that 'old saying' - Cav et Emptor . . . . maybe?

Diesel Fuel Additive Test
 
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  #13  
Old 12-20-2009, 05:58 PM
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yep sulphur added to fuel was to collect and disperse water in fuel, the less sulphur the more water causing injection problems. i have also been told to use a fuel additive in every tank for the reason of the govt robbing us of cetane and other good stuff. i use power service.
 
  #14  
Old 12-21-2009, 06:48 AM
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Originally Posted by millco View Post
I'm only aware of one study in the public domain that showed what raw fuel tested at and how that compared to most of the additives on the shelf today. I was amazed to see that most of the so called additives do nothing for making the fuel more lubricated. Some even hurt lubricity!
By just stating that fuel doesn't lube well enough because it is low in sulfur is indicative of not actually understanding what is going on here. Sulfur doesn't lube fuel at all. Now, removing it does tend to lower the fuels ability to lube, yes. That is because the process of removing the sulfur also happens to remove components that lube the fuel. But to use the measure of sulfur in fuel as an indication of how well it lubes, is false science! Refer back to Cummins response, Shell's response or any other statement you can find on corporate websites all across the globe. They will all tell you that a lube has to be added to fuel now days. The EPA won't allow any lube added to fuel to also add back in sulfur!
You can read this study for yourself and see what I'm talking about . . . . (It also opened my eyes to some of the so- called additives on the market today. Marketing hype and sales pitches are not what I want or need to put into my engine. I want to stick with proven, tested products. Wonder if I can catch the kid before he opens that gallon of Marvel . . . . )
(Don't get me wrong: I think that fuel suppliers are going to just do the minimum and cut costs where they can. So will every other supplier that we purchase anything from. That is just a fact of life. What is that 'old saying' - Cav et Emptor . . . . maybe?

Diesel Fuel Additive Test
Caveat Emptor...buyer beware.

What about the HFRR (high frequency reciprocating rig) test results I have seen posted? They seem scientific enough to me to show the added lubricitiy that some of these products supply. The best among them was an Opti Lube product as I recall.
 
  #15  
Old 12-21-2009, 01:52 PM
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The HFRR results is a good indicator, as long as you are comparing apples to apples. I think if you consider they ran 2-stroke at 200-to-1 it becomes a a very attractive solution. I believe most using 2-stroke are running around double that concentration. At that rate it should be a top, if not the best performer.
 
  #16  
Old 12-24-2009, 10:02 PM
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If you can get it running 2% Bio is the best lube for the fuel system. As for some of the other additives they listed I don't like using those that contain a lot of solvent like Power Service.
 
  #17  
Old 01-13-2010, 07:45 AM
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Everyone who doesn't have their head in the sand knows the govt/EPA has dealt a rotten blow to the diesel world in the name of saving the planet. The controversy along with fierce competition in the petroleum industry just make fuel additives a non politically correct subject altogether.

Bastards.
 
  #18  
Old 01-13-2010, 04:27 PM
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Sure would like to get a hold of this additive and try it out. Fleetguard Platinum Plus® DFX Catalyst.


Platinum Plus® DFX Fuel Borne Catalyst is a technologically advanced diesel fuel additive designed to increase the rate and completeness of fuel combustion and to clean up fuel systems and injectors.

Composition: Platinum Plus DFX contains a patented bimetallic combustion catalyst that increases power and restores fuel economy while reducing particulate matter (PM), soot, smoke, and gaseous emissions. Platinum Plus DFX upgrades typical #2 diesel to an “ultra” premium diesel. Platinum Plus DFX also contains a premium detergent additive that cleans the fuel system of deposits and when used regularly, restores fuel economy.

Application: Platinum Plus DFX is formulated for use with #2 diesel, low sulfur diesel fuel, kerosene, or biodiesel blends. For emissions reduction and to restore fuel economy, the minimum recommended dosage is 1 gallon (3.78 L) per 1500 gallons (5678.12 L) of fuel.
 
  #19  
Old 01-15-2010, 05:41 AM
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Hmmm. . . . . I have to wonder if the stuff would do all that. Sounds like a 'commercial' if you know what I mean. Don't get me wrong: I hope it would work! I just remember the 'ads' for the new emissions motors. Didn't they talk about better fuel economy and such? I was just talking to a friend who drives for a living. The 'older' trucks they have that are non- DPF and non- Urea (All '07 and newer) get over 4 mpg. The newest ones with all that emission crap are getting under 4 mpg. I know my math is real bad but that seems like less economy to me! It also seems to me that the ads may have been wrong . . . .
 
  #20  
Old 01-15-2010, 08:46 AM
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Originally Posted by 06Dodge View Post
Sure would like to get a hold of this additive and try it out. Fleetguard Platinum Plus® DFX Catalyst.


Platinum Plus® DFX Fuel Borne Catalyst is a technologically advanced diesel fuel additive designed to increase the rate and completeness of fuel combustion and to clean up fuel systems and injectors.

Composition: Platinum Plus DFX contains a patented bimetallic combustion catalyst that increases power and restores fuel economy while reducing particulate matter (PM), soot, smoke, and gaseous emissions. Platinum Plus DFX upgrades typical #2 diesel to an “ultra” premium diesel. Platinum Plus DFX also contains a premium detergent additive that cleans the fuel system of deposits and when used regularly, restores fuel economy.

Application: Platinum Plus DFX is formulated for use with #2 diesel, low sulfur diesel fuel, kerosene, or biodiesel blends. For emissions reduction and to restore fuel economy, the minimum recommended dosage is 1 gallon (3.78 L) per 1500 gallons (5678.12 L) of fuel.
Don't get me wrong here cause I am no subject matter expert but isn't the reason that guy's went away from propane is because it burns to complete and has a habit of burning through piston's and anything that say's it cleans fuel deposit's has alcohol blended in and is a drying agent on seals and pumps.

This is more a question here then a fact.
 

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