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Ford Powerstroke 99-03 7.3L Discussion of 99-03 7.3 Liter Ford Powerstroke Turbo Diesels

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Old 11-04-2014, 10:53 AM
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What kind of problems would I get if I ran Jet A in a 2000 7.3 F350 power stroke?
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Old 11-04-2014, 11:32 AM
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Why?
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Old 11-04-2014, 11:41 AM
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I have access to jet a and was wondering if I could use it without causing lots of problems
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Old 11-04-2014, 06:47 PM
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i wouldnt even chance it
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Old 11-04-2014, 07:39 PM
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OK. Thank you for your advise
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Old 11-04-2014, 10:00 PM
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"In regards to your inquiry about whether Jet A can be run in a diesel engine, Chevron would never advise anyone to use a particular fuel in an engine that was not designed for that fuel. We would advise that the inquiry be made to the equipment (engine) manufacturer."

Remember, while there is only one basic Jet A species, there are several kinds of diesel - diesel No. 1 and diesel No. 2 (amongst others). Jet A is more like Diesel No. 1. Diesel No. 2 is the more common "diesel" fuel, since it is the fuel used by vehicles "on-road".

All of the fuels are products of the refining process. One of the main differences between them is their distillation boiling ranges. Diesel No. 2 has a higher (in temperature) boiling range and is more dense than Jet A and/or diesel No. 1 (both of which have lower densities and lower boiling range temperatures). A fuel which is less dense will have lower fuel economy (less BTU's per gallon). All of this is "besides the point" as far as the appropriateness of any of the three to perform in the engines that were designed for their use. If the engine manufacturer indicates the use of only one type of fuel, that is the fuel that should be used.

For further information please visit Chevron's INTERNET site at Chevron Corporation Home Page
There are some very informative publications at the site at http://www.chevron.com/chevron_root/prodserv (there is an "underscore" character after the second "chevron" word). When you reach that site, click on the word "Fuels" and you will then see a "Publications" option.

That said, we will break down your inquiries into a group of statements that we have put together to answer others who have asked similar questions:

Jet A, Diesel No. 1, and Diesel No. 2, are covered by different American Society For Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifications. The diesel fuels are covered by ASTM D 975, "Standard Specification for Diesel Fuel Oils". Jet A has the designation of ASTM D 1655, "Standard Specification for Aviation Turbine Fuels".

According to the ASTM specifications listed above, the sulfur limit for Jet A is a maximum of 0.3 mass %. Because of an Environmental Protection Agency 1993 regulation, the specification for sulfur in "on road" Diesel No. 1 and Diesel No. 2 is a maximum of 0.05 mass % - a large difference from the Jet A sulfur level.

The EPA regulation would be broken if one were to use Jet A for "on-road" Diesel. Jet A is also not taxed for "on-road" use, so would be illegal to use in "on-road" vehicles and possibly illegal in some "off-road" uses as well. Both the sulfur level and the tax issue need to be considered in a legal sense when considering the uses of these fuels.

Another difference between the fuels is the viscosity. The ASTM D 1655 detailed viscosity requirement of Jet A is a maximum of 8 mm2/S (millimeter squared/Seconds - [1mm2/S = 1 Centistoke]) at -200C. The ASTM D 975 viscosity requirement of Diesel No. 1 is a minimum of 1.3 and a maximum of 2.4 mm2/S at 400C and of Diesel No. 2, a minimum of 1.9 and a maximum of 4.1 mm2/S at 400C. It is hard to compare these, since the testing temperatures of the diesels do not agree with that of the Jet A. However, the viscosities at 200 Centigrade and in units "milliPascal/Seconds" (still another, and different unit measurement) for the two fuels according to a national average of four semiannual surveys taken from 1990-1992 are as follows:

Jet A & Diesel No. 1 1.33
Diesel No. 2 3.20

Jet A and Diesel No. 1 tend towards lower viscosities. Lower lubricity is likely as the viscosity decreases. While this may not cause catastrophic instant damage, it could cause long-term wear of pumps, etc.

Jet fuels have additional specifications that aren't required of diesel fuels. A couple examples of these are the requirement of testing for certain components and a volatility requirement. Some of the methods for testing also vary from one fuel to the other. Basically, however, we have pointed out the biggest differences. If you need more detailed comparisons, please contact the ASTM society at their headquarters at 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, Pennsylvania 19428. They could provide you with copies of the specifications. Their phone number is 610-832-9500.

Once again, we stress that you should contact the equipment manufacturers and ask what fuels are proper for use in the engines you are curious about. Also, you must make certain you are not breaking any legal regulations."

So the bottom line is that although Jet-A may not cause immediate damage to a diesel engine and may allow the engine to run OK, its use may cause premature wear or fouling of the fuel system, and you may be breaking EPA regulations as well as not paying appropriate taxes. Outside the US, differences in viscosity still mean that the use of Jet-A for Diesel No. 1
may cause early wear of the fuel system. Kind of like running 10 weight oil in a car designed for 30 weight. So how much risk are you willing to take, because no engine manufacturer or fuel supplier will take part of the risk?
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Old 11-04-2014, 10:04 PM
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After reading that, if your still going to use the JET A, make sure you add a lubricant, cause JET A is dry
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